New from the Easel…. watercolour, Encaustic and Acrylic


1945 SOLD

“1945” Encaustic incorporating photos (photo transfer) dad took in Hiroshima immediately after the dropping of the bomb in 1945. Also incorporated  is a photo transfer of a copy of the peace treaty he was given as a witness to its signing. I do not do many historical works but this is special. For many years I had been wanting to do an artwork based on dad’s experience but could never find the right medium….. until I discovered encaustic art. Perfect to suggest the devastation and the age and I could use copies of his actual photos. On display at Burnie Regional Gallery, Tasmania as part of Burnie Coastal Art Groups. TasArt exhibition.

after-the-fires-2016

After the Fires, 2016″. Encaustic. I finally finished this work, started some months ago. Tasmania experienced unprecedented fires in 2016 and returning to some of the charred wilderness areas I find they are both sad and hauntingly beautiful. That is what I aimed to relate in this wax work. Setting fire to shellac on the surface, gives another link of the artwork’s creation and the fires we experienced. On Display at the Tasmanian Art Awards at Eskleigh, Perth Tasmania, first weekend November 2016.

nelso-bay-sunsetSOLD

“Quiet Times, Nelson Bay, Tarkine Coast”.  Watercolour. It had been a wet day but on dusk the rain cleared and soft colours were so soothing. A quick photo shoot to record the changing light and later in the studio this watercolour took me back to the moment. 

struggle-for-survival SOLD

“Struggle for Survival, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast”. Acrylic with texture paste on gallery stretch canvas. I did this work earlier this year but felt the bleached log was too stark so recently re-worked that. Happier now as the red lichen takes on a more important role. The branch and bleached twigs are skeletons decaying, but rotting down they provide nutrients for the native geranium in its own pocket. Lichen is an amazing organism which is incredibly well adapted to harsh conditions such as here on Tasmania’s West Coast. On display at TASART Burnie 2016

wedge-tail-eaglein-the-treetop SOLD

“Tree top Eagle”, watercolour. The eye was improved after taking this photo. A small work makes it tricky to do the eye detail Sold

wip-eagle SOLD

WIP. Wedge Tail Eagle. Watercolour.  Contrasting with the “wildness” of encaustic I have also enjoyed doing some careful illustration of birds over the past couple of weeks.” Ihis will be on display at my stall at the Tasmanian Craft Fair, Deloraine,  Nov 3 to 7th, 2016

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Acrylic paintings with texture (rocks)


I love geology and looking at patterns in rocks, their colours and textures. As well as the scientific observations I do enjoy doing paintings of rocks. Tasmania’s  (Australia) North West and West Coast are wonderful spots for inspiration for rock based paintings. These 3 are all painted in acrylic (Atelier Interactive) on Canvas board (10×14 inch = 25.4×35.6cm). I have used Matisse modelling compound (my preferred of the many texture media I have tried) to achieve textural effects in the 2 Tarkine works.

To apply the paint and medium I have used both brushes and palette knives.

Top left: Kings Run, Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness  (SOLD)                 Bottom Left: Goat Island , Penguin Coast Rd, NW Tasmania ($100)        Right: Red Lichen, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness ($100)

Christmas is coming…. designing cards


I have been having fun designing Christmas Cards.

Fun time of year! Yes I know it is early… but design, print, market…. it all takes time!

Both are watercolours. “Chatterbox Wren” is a photo of a watercolour I did from a photo i took of a very young Superb Blue Wren making such a racket chirping on the roof. I edited the photo of the painting to add the Santa hat and wording.

blue wren Christmas 2

The idea for the card below came about a couple of years ago when I was showing watercolour students how to paint a group of simple figures in the style of internationally renowned watercolorist, Robert Wade….. “Bob’s Blobs”. It was near Christmas and I love that red hat as a symbol of Christmas so voila!!!!! I have added red text since doing this little painting

Christmas

Mixed media paintings… the playful artist


wilderness track

wilderness track

For those of us who like to play with art materials and explore new avenues without boundaries, mixed media is wonderful. Above, “Wilderness Track” is a large work painted in acrylic which was applied from very dilute, like watercolour, to thick impasto painted on with a palette knife. Pencils, oil pastel, soft pastel sumi ink and white pigment ink were all applied at various stages. The ground was an Art Spectrum Colorfix paper in a rich terracotta colour, hence the warm overall glow. The inspiration was a coastal walking track on Tasmania.s Tarkine coast. Walking between the towering angular rocks is amazing.

Raw

Raw

On one of the days over Easter 2015 when I was, with about 70 other artists,on Tasmania’s Tarkine Coast, I was taken on a 4WD expedition down past the sealed tracks. To get to such remote and wild places was unforgettable. It is the geology of the area that continually attracts me…. and of course the ever changing ocean and sky.This work is also painted on Colorfix paper, this time in a warm grey. After working with very wet acrylic paints and a spray bottle of water, I used  the side of the wet solid Sumi ink stick  and  a little liquid ink applied with a rigger brush to keep the stokes fluid and loose. Finally linear marks with charcoal and a touch of pastel completed the textural effects for which I was aiming.IMG_8994This third painting was about the intensity of the colour of the red lichen so it was started with oil paint stick and oil pastel on a very rough Fabriano watercolour paper. Light watercolour washes were applied to the sky and sea as a foil for the heavy texture of the rocks. Watercolour was also applied as glazes over the rocks, with the previously applied oil based media acting as a resist, thus retaining the intense colour.  Finally Sumi ink was added in three ways….. dragging the broad end of the wet stick across the paper, drawing some crevice lines directly with the wet stick, applying the ink using 2 brushes to direct flow for tonal areas, and varied ways of applying with a rigger brush. Wonderful textures resulted.  
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This small,  quick work was completed primarily with acrylic applied with a palette knife and fingers. Final touches were added with Sumi ink and a little oil pastel. It captures the drama and inspiring natural forms of this threatened wilderness area.

Painting on canvas from a reference photo.


Reference photo from Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast, Tasmania. Actually I took a number of photos at different exposure because the lighting was tricky. I was careful to compose my photo so that it would create a good composition for a painting. I was drawn to the geology and the colourful seaweed draped over the rocks… and of course the location!!!!!!

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Quick sketch with dilute paint. I draw loosely with the brush using dilute raw sienna rather than carefully with a pencil, as I want a free flowing work capturing the essence of the location rather than absolute photographic accuracy. This is really just a basic compositional guide to fit the features into the format of the canvas.

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First layers of paint. For the sky I mainly applied the paint with my hand and fingers….. for the rocks, more boldly with a flat brush and palette knife.

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I rather liked the white canvas for the sea in the photo above, but not in reality, so I added “sea” and more rocks.,,,, especially another layer on the right hand side.

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The sea needed lightening and a bit more variation in hue and tone, and I painted the rocks in the sea. IMG_0058

Still to go…. a few more little rocks to help link the sand to the larger formations and the decision as to how much “decoration” to include…. seaweed, twigs, beach debris.

Painting on Yupo


Anyone who follows my art knows that I love experimenting. For some time I have been trying to paint my memories of when I could go into caves.  Karst geology is fascinating and we have wonderful examples of Karst system caves in Tasmania. I am rarely happy with my  paintings of the limestone caves and I have been pondering how to get closer to what I want. I think this one is getting there.

I used the synthetic Yupo surface , a very slippery, plastic “paper” and I worked with pigment ink or liquid acrylic because of the intensity of colour. I have worked on Yupo before with watercolour paint and the colour lifts off easily. I thought the pigment ink would be similar but ,of course, as it is acrylic,

Mole Creek Caves, Tasmania

Mole Creek Caves, Tasmania

it stays permanently in place. There is a lot of negative painting in this to retain the lights.

Landscape painting from the imagination…. winter


Winter (imagined)

Winter (imagined)

On Friday I took a small workshop on introduction to abstract art in acrylics. We discussed abstract art and googled images to see the diversity and degrees of abstraction. This is a painting I did on canvas board. “Winter”… the mountains just appeared… abstracted? This is not based on any real place or even an intention to paint mountains and snow. it just evolved ….. whenever I play with paint I am likely to end up with something suggesting a landscape. It is hardly realism but does it meet “abstraction”. I prefer the term” landscapes from the imagination” and as this started to emerge from the canvas I was reminded of a painting done about this time last year of Everest Base Camp. What I most wanted participants to do was to explore a multitude of ways to apply paint to a surface. This was primarily done with the palette knife. It is such FUN and even as adults we should give ourselves permission to “play” and “waste” materials as it is through doing this that we learn.