New from the Easel…. watercolour, Encaustic and Acrylic


1945 SOLD

“1945” Encaustic incorporating photos (photo transfer) dad took in Hiroshima immediately after the dropping of the bomb in 1945. Also incorporated  is a photo transfer of a copy of the peace treaty he was given as a witness to its signing. I do not do many historical works but this is special. For many years I had been wanting to do an artwork based on dad’s experience but could never find the right medium….. until I discovered encaustic art. Perfect to suggest the devastation and the age and I could use copies of his actual photos. On display at Burnie Regional Gallery, Tasmania as part of Burnie Coastal Art Groups. TasArt exhibition.

after-the-fires-2016

After the Fires, 2016″. Encaustic. I finally finished this work, started some months ago. Tasmania experienced unprecedented fires in 2016 and returning to some of the charred wilderness areas I find they are both sad and hauntingly beautiful. That is what I aimed to relate in this wax work. Setting fire to shellac on the surface, gives another link of the artwork’s creation and the fires we experienced. On Display at the Tasmanian Art Awards at Eskleigh, Perth Tasmania, first weekend November 2016.

nelso-bay-sunsetSOLD

“Quiet Times, Nelson Bay, Tarkine Coast”.  Watercolour. It had been a wet day but on dusk the rain cleared and soft colours were so soothing. A quick photo shoot to record the changing light and later in the studio this watercolour took me back to the moment. 

struggle-for-survival SOLD

“Struggle for Survival, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast”. Acrylic with texture paste on gallery stretch canvas. I did this work earlier this year but felt the bleached log was too stark so recently re-worked that. Happier now as the red lichen takes on a more important role. The branch and bleached twigs are skeletons decaying, but rotting down they provide nutrients for the native geranium in its own pocket. Lichen is an amazing organism which is incredibly well adapted to harsh conditions such as here on Tasmania’s West Coast. On display at TASART Burnie 2016

wedge-tail-eaglein-the-treetop SOLD

“Tree top Eagle”, watercolour. The eye was improved after taking this photo. A small work makes it tricky to do the eye detail Sold

wip-eagle SOLD

WIP. Wedge Tail Eagle. Watercolour.  Contrasting with the “wildness” of encaustic I have also enjoyed doing some careful illustration of birds over the past couple of weeks.” Ihis will be on display at my stall at the Tasmanian Craft Fair, Deloraine,  Nov 3 to 7th, 2016

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Acrylic paintings with texture (rocks)


I love geology and looking at patterns in rocks, their colours and textures. As well as the scientific observations I do enjoy doing paintings of rocks. Tasmania’s  (Australia) North West and West Coast are wonderful spots for inspiration for rock based paintings. These 3 are all painted in acrylic (Atelier Interactive) on Canvas board (10×14 inch = 25.4×35.6cm). I have used Matisse modelling compound (my preferred of the many texture media I have tried) to achieve textural effects in the 2 Tarkine works.

To apply the paint and medium I have used both brushes and palette knives.

Top left: Kings Run, Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness  (SOLD)                 Bottom Left: Goat Island , Penguin Coast Rd, NW Tasmania ($100)        Right: Red Lichen, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness ($100)

Encaustic paintings


I have been thoroughly enjoying exploring encaustic art both in teaching the basics to others, experimenting more myself and attending a workshop with a fabulous encaustic artist, Mo Godbeer. So much to discover…. more pics to come

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Tarkine in Motion …Hobart, Long Gallery, Exhibition


I wish I could get to Hobart for the opening of the Tarkine in Motion exhibition tomorrow evening. Artworks evolving out of 70 artists responding to Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness will be on display at Hobart’;s Long Gallery until 4th February 2016. (50 of the 70 artists exhibiting in the is huge display).

Tasmania is fairly small yes, but it is about a 4 hour drive each way from our home to Hobart, so it is not as easy as non Tasmanian’s might think to “pop down” to our capital city.

I have already delivered some works to be hung but I have seen mine…. I really want to see those of everyone else. We will get down for bump out…. hopefully before others start collecting their treasures.

As you will see from these images of 4 of the 5 works I sent to be considered for inclusion, I was drawn, as usual, to the coast, the raw energy, the water movement and especially the rocks.

Geoartscape, Sarah Anne Rocks

Geo-artscape, Sarah Anne Rocks. Acrylic on stretched canvas.

Struggle for Survival

“”Struggle for Survival” watercolour, 300gsm SW rough paper. Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast. 2015

working on colourfix

Red Lichen, Acrylic on Colourfix

The Calm Belies the Turmoil acrylic on gallery stretched canvas

The Calm Belies the Turmoil. Acrylic on stretched canvas

 

 

The preliminary photo from  Dan Broun of setting up looks good. A treasure trove of photography, painting, printmaking and jewellery…. and there will be floor talks. There have already been a number of musical and film performances which have been presented to enthusiastic audiences in Hobart. We want to save this last bit of Gondwanaland with its rich indigenous heritage rather than have it destroyed by logging and mining. Ironically, at present, much is under bushfires started by dry lightening strikes. Lets hope, at least, the old rainforest is not damaged too much. We so desperately need rain

 

Painting on canvas from a reference photo.


Reference photo from Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast, Tasmania. Actually I took a number of photos at different exposure because the lighting was tricky. I was careful to compose my photo so that it would create a good composition for a painting. I was drawn to the geology and the colourful seaweed draped over the rocks… and of course the location!!!!!!

IMG_0047

Quick sketch with dilute paint. I draw loosely with the brush using dilute raw sienna rather than carefully with a pencil, as I want a free flowing work capturing the essence of the location rather than absolute photographic accuracy. This is really just a basic compositional guide to fit the features into the format of the canvas.

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First layers of paint. For the sky I mainly applied the paint with my hand and fingers….. for the rocks, more boldly with a flat brush and palette knife.

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I rather liked the white canvas for the sea in the photo above, but not in reality, so I added “sea” and more rocks.,,,, especially another layer on the right hand side.

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The sea needed lightening and a bit more variation in hue and tone, and I painted the rocks in the sea. IMG_0058

Still to go…. a few more little rocks to help link the sand to the larger formations and the decision as to how much “decoration” to include…. seaweed, twigs, beach debris.

Paintings from the Tarkine Coast (Tasmania’s wild west)


These are some of the works that were painted on site or have been evolving since my visit to Tasmania’s Tarkine Coast over Easter. More to come. Working on a larger acrylic using texture medium because I love the texture of the rocks there, but I am out of white and so is my supplier!. Frustration! I have to wait for an order from another supplier to arrive…. can get other brands but I likeAtelier Interactive.

The lichen on the rocks is amazing. this is a mm work using oil resists with watercolour and ink on rough paper to refelct the coarse textures of the subject.

The lichen on the rocks is amazing. this is a mm work using oil resists with watercolour and ink on rough paper to refelct the coarse textures of the subject.

Nelson Bay watercolour

Metamorphosed strata protrude from sand and surf

on site watercolour and Sumi Ink. Kings Run. JPG

Painted quickly on site on a bright but overcast day. The rough Langton paper helped with suggesting the pebbled shore

WC and ink, on site, Kings Run

The first work painted on site… watercolour and sumi ink…. setting the mood and getting into the flow. Sitting in this location grinding ink on a stone and letting watercolour float over the paper’s surface is so meditative.

Geology inspiring art


What inspires your art?
Studying to be a Maths and Science teacher at Uni I loved Geology (well I loved it all actually). Now, as an artist, I often think about how much art was within the geology I studied. Drawing crystal shapes with their faces represented in 3D, recording layers of strata, using symbols in geological mapping, looking at relative grain size…….. This work is based on my experiences with geology, although not of the scientific accuracy.

Geology and art Watercolour and Ink Sheffield, Tasmania

Geology and art
Watercolour and Ink
Sheffield, Tasmania

It also demonstrates the “magic’ of watercolour for suggesting texture. It was recently awarded an encouragement award. I have thoughts to share with you on that term “encouragement award” and will post later on that.