Encaustic painting of the coast…. passions meld


A bird's eye view

My most frequented subject for my art over many years has been the coast.

I love living on the coast. I can sit and watch the waves roll in for hours. I have painted many other subjects…. recently geological inspired works, but even that was often rocks along our coastline.

My most recent painting medium is encaustic. I love the fluidity of molten wax, I love the fluidity of the ocean. Combined…. encaustic painting with the coast as the inspiration is, for me, a “match made in heaven”.

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Art Fair Preparation…. watercolours


I have been taking my art to theTasmanian Craft Fair at Deloraine in Tasmania for more than 10 years. Although I sort of know what to do, I always find that towards the end I am coming up with heaps of ideas but not enough time to act on them. Not as many watercolours this year but I do probably have  enough (except for flowers), and today I have been cutting matts, wrapping in cello (close fitting bags when possible) and pricing (now that is tricky). Hint: re cellophane…. I always use the top quality PR range as it is crystal clear and sturdy. Here are a few of my latest watercolours ready to go to new homes. (available as early bird purchase)

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Loose style figures add life and umbrellas are great for colour. As the artist you can choose whatever colour umbrellas you want. I love the way the lady in the yellow jumper looks a little cautious in the wet, while the lady is the green jacket does not seem to worry.

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I used the cling wrap technique here to get some of the light patterns. Throw colours on, use the wrap.remove and decide what it wants to be. I love this imaginative style of working as you never know what will emerge from the surface.

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I visited Melbourne this year in late Autumn, early Winter, hence this street scene and the rainy day umbrella ones. I want to go back again for more inspiration. The flickers of white (unpainted  spots of the paper’s rough surface (300gsm Saunders Waterford rough), suggest sunlight.

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Another rainy day in Melbourne, and another loose style watercolour with flickers of light. SOLD

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Back in Tasmania for this one. My beloved Tarkine Wilderness Coast (Nelson Bay). We stayed for a couple of nights at Arthur R. This was the first evening, it had been raining but on sunset the sky cleared for a while and lovely soft sunset colours said “peace”.

New from the Easel…. watercolour, Encaustic and Acrylic


1945

“1945” Encaustic incorporating photos (photo transfer) dad took in Hiroshima immediately after the dropping of the bomb in 1945. Also incorporated  is a photo transfer of a copy of the peace treaty he was given as a witness to its signing. I do not do many historical works but this is special. For many years I had been wanting to do an artwork based on dad’s experience but could never find the right medium….. until I discovered encaustic art. Perfect to suggest the devastation and the age and I could use copies of his actual photos. On display at Burnie Regional Gallery, Tasmania as part of Burnie Coastal Art Groups. TasArt exhibition.

after-the-fires-2016

After the Fires, 2016″. Encaustic. I finally finished this work, started some months ago. Tasmania experienced unprecedented fires in 2016 and returning to some of the charred wilderness areas I find they are both sad and hauntingly beautiful. That is what I aimed to relate in this wax work. Setting fire to shellac on the surface, gives another link of the artwork’s creation and the fires we experienced. On Display at the Tasmanian Art Awards at Eskleigh, Perth Tasmania, first weekend November 2016.

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“Quiet Times, Nelson Bay, Tarkine Coast”.  Watercolour. It had been a wet day but on dusk the rain cleared and soft colours were so soothing. A quick photo shoot to record the changing light and later in the studio this watercolour took me back to the moment. 

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“Struggle for Survival, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast”. Acrylic with texture paste on gallery stretch canvas. I did this work earlier this year but felt the bleached log was too stark so recently re-worked that. Happier now as the red lichen takes on a more important role. The branch and bleached twigs are skeletons decaying, but rotting down they provide nutrients for the native geranium in its own pocket. Lichen is an amazing organism which is incredibly well adapted to harsh conditions such as here on Tasmania’s West Coast. On display at TASART Burnie 2016

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“Tree top Eagle”, watercolour. The eye was improved after taking this photo. A small work makes it tricky to do the eye detail Sold

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WIP. Wedge Tail Eagle. Watercolour.  Contrasting with the “wildness” of encaustic I have also enjoyed doing some careful illustration of birds over the past couple of weeks.” Ihis will be on display at my stall at the Tasmanian Craft Fair, Deloraine,  Nov 3 to 7th, 2016

Acrylic paintings with texture (rocks)


I love geology and looking at patterns in rocks, their colours and textures. As well as the scientific observations I do enjoy doing paintings of rocks. Tasmania’s  (Australia) North West and West Coast are wonderful spots for inspiration for rock based paintings. These 3 are all painted in acrylic (Atelier Interactive) on Canvas board (10×14 inch = 25.4×35.6cm). I have used Matisse modelling compound (my preferred of the many texture media I have tried) to achieve textural effects in the 2 Tarkine works.

To apply the paint and medium I have used both brushes and palette knives.

Top left: Kings Run, Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness  (SOLD)                 Bottom Left: Goat Island , Penguin Coast Rd, NW Tasmania ($100)        Right: Red Lichen, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness ($100)

Tasmanian Waterfall… mixed media watercolour


I have a lovely friend (Laurie Davison) who takes the most magnificent photos of Tasmanian waterfalls and gets to ones no-one else does. No way could I walk where he does, so he has kindly allowed me to do my loose painterly interpretations of his photo.

This is a waterfall near Deloraine in the Meander Valley, Tasmania, at the base of the Western Tiers. I loved the greens in his photo, indicating the excellent environmental health of the area. So good to see.

A little more work to do on this. Mixed media painting, but it captures the freshness of our Tasmanian Wilderness

good health

I started with oil pastel as a resist to make sureI got some fresh greens and texture. The support is 300gsm Saunders Rough paper. After the oil pastel came the watercolour, wet in wet, but reserving some whites by not painting the area. A bit of dry brush for sparkle. Sumi ink for some calligraphic strokes. Scraping with a blade to bring back a few more sparkles and a few strokes of Chinese white. Inktense pencils were used to re-enforce some areas.

Gotta love playing with mixed media. I am fortunate to have a huge amount of art materials (the clock is ticking and I feel the urge to make sure I use them all!!!!!!)

Macro garden shots from Sony A7ii


Today, with a little welcome sunshine, I took my mirror-less, full frame camera into the garden to try out the macro lens (FE2.8/90). The poor flowers were a little worse for wear from the recent rain, icy weather and winds and some parts of our garden/jungle are so overgrown I did not venture to capture all my gorgeous camellias.

I did not use a tripod…. not really a good idea with macro shots, but being impatient, I wanted first to see what sort of photos lazy play would give. With the use of a tripod and more manual adjustments the results should only get better.

Even with this quick episode I am pretty happy….. those potato vine flowers are 3 cm across the widest part of the biggest one and the tiny forget me nots  are 9mm (less than 1 cm) or less across the widest part of the bigger one!!!! (in summer I find they grow larger)

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