Camellias in winter sunshine


From my garden today.

Macro garden shots from Sony A7ii


Today, with a little welcome sunshine, I took my mirror-less, full frame camera into the garden to try out the macro lens (FE2.8/90). The poor flowers were a little worse for wear from the recent rain, icy weather and winds and some parts of our garden/jungle are so overgrown I did not venture to capture all my gorgeous camellias.

I did not use a tripod…. not really a good idea with macro shots, but being impatient, I wanted first to see what sort of photos lazy play would give. With the use of a tripod and more manual adjustments the results should only get better.

Even with this quick episode I am pretty happy….. those potato vine flowers are 3 cm across the widest part of the biggest one and the tiny forget me nots  are 9mm (less than 1 cm) or less across the widest part of the bigger one!!!! (in summer I find they grow larger)

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New artworks on silk


I have been busy lately, with commissioned works. Earlier in the week I posted, to the Hilton Hotel gift shop in Cairns, Queensland, Australia, 10 of my my handpainted sets….silk scarf with matching brooch which enable the wearer many styling options. Most of the brooches were my preferred landscape impressions but on two I painted images inspired by the colourful fish of the Great Barrier Reef.

the lobby shop Cairns9and10jpg

The Lobby Shop Cairns 1to4 copy

the lobby shop cairns 5to8 copy

Today I also completed another scarf (no brooch) on which I have been working as a sample requested by Griffith University, again in Queensland. The scarves they are considering are to have Queensland native flowers on them and the suggestion was the Waratah on a sample item. Ready to mail tomorrow.

Waratah scarf copy

A third commission completed is a blue wren on silk. What a novel idea from the couple asking for this as a special silk anniversary gift.

blue wren on silk, silk anniversary  copy

Encaustic painting in jewellery settings.


I have too many paintings for the walls and I have always enjoyed “small” so increasingly I am doing tiny works to put into jewellery settings. Many are silk paintings but I have also been exploring my own unique way of painting with pigmented wax,encaustic paintings, as wearable art. Encaustic paintings are beautifully vivid and under the glass cabochon the 3-dimensionality is accentuated. These are selling so well locally and to cruise ship visitors that I am finding it difficult to keep up with demand. Many, like the set, are based on flowers in my garden but some are abstract ocassionally suggesting a scene.No two can be the same as it is not possible to get that degree of control with the way I work. But that is how I like it … each unique item to be paired with a unique wearer.
Today I bought a mini tripod and remote shutter for my mobile phone so I can take photos of my work quickly and without any camera shake. All I need now is to make up a tent to get rid of the reflection of the studio windows.

Encaustic art pendant. Original painting. "Red Tulips". Silver setting. Sterling silver snake chain. Oval. 50x30mm. Clear glass cabochon.

Encaustic art pendant. Original painting. “Red Tulips”. Silver setting. Sterling silver snake chain. Oval. 50x30mm. Clear glass cabochon.

Red Tulip pendant and bangle set. Original paintings. Encaustic art as wearable art.

Red Tulip pendant and bangle set. Original paintings. Encaustic art as wearable art.

Hinge opening bracelet. Fit up to 20cm wrist. Original encaustic painting in silver setting with clear glass dome cabochon protecting art work.

Hinge opening bracelet. Fit up to 20cm wrist. Original encaustic painting in silver setting with clear glass dome cabochon protecting art work.


These will be availabble on my handmade shop at a later date.

Iris, watercolour


I was given some iris flowers from a friend and last night managed a watercolour before they died… just a few flowers and buds left but enough to capture their “personality”. The big, soft, droopy petals make me think of dogs’ ears…. only more colourful. I have “manufactured” my own colour combinations, as is permitted of an artist if not working rigidly in a botanical illustration manner. However, no one would doubt these are iris. I do hope you agree that I have captured the essence of the elegant, garden favourites.

I did a little light, compositional drawing, but primarily employed freehand painting in a brush painting style on a very unforgiving, smooth, lightweight (120 gsm) Fabriano drawing paper. Challenging, but what a fresh finish it yields.I deliberately chose the paper to ensure I did not go back and “fix” anything…. no overpainting as the soft surface cannot handle that.

I do so love the brush painting style, with the variation of pressure and pulling a twisting a multi-loaded soft brush across the paper surface. Pure meditation!

Iris, watercolour

Iris, watercolour

Latest silk painting… nasturtium


Our nasturtiums have been grown in large pots and an old wheelbarrow this year and they are overflowing their containers. A profusion of greenery speckled with some colourful flowers, they look very healthy, even in our cold winter months. For this reason I have called this painting tenacity as they are truly a tenacious plant.
Technical details…
10 mommie Habutai pure silk stretched onto a wooden frame for working
iron fixed paint for silk (various brands),
gutta resist outline for some flowers, leaves and some squiggles (rich gold gutta applied through a metal tip on an applicator bottle)
watercolour technique in the background
completed and fixed work mounted onto pre glued foamcore then framed behind glassNasturtiums on silk... Tenacity

Material Girl entry …..2014 finalist


I am really pleased that for the third consecutive year my entry in Tasmania’s Material Girl Exhibition has made the finals. This year’s theme is Tall poppies…. late bloomers. I pondered a portrait of “tall poppies’, Mother Moses being a favourite “tall poppy, and very much a “late bloomer”. I love painting poppies, especially on silk, so did contemplate maybe a literal interpretation. Then I thought of doing a very minimalist contemporary style work…. a single (actual) poppy seed glued onto a large canvas (medium: “collage” I suppose). That would be titled simple “Potential”.
After listening to Jane Lamont talk at the launch, where the amazing woman described herself as rather a short, yellow,daisy I started thinking along another line. I love the variety of friends and family in my life, tall poppies or not. I love the variety of flowers in the garden and that they reveal their full glory at different times. So my entry is “Not all tall poppies” the acrylic painted with a palette knife, an image of which I posted about a month ago.

Acrylic on canvas painted with a palette knife.  "Not all Tall Poppies" Material Girl 2014 Finalist

Acrylic on canvas painted with a palette knife.
“Not all Tall Poppies”
Material Girl 2014 Finalist


Accompanying Artist’s Statement
Variety is the “spice of Life”. Genetics, environment, life’s circumstances…. all contribute to what something is and when potential will be maximised.
A world full of only tall poppies would not have the colour, interest and variety of “my” world with all it’s magnificent individuals.