Mixed media paintings… the playful artist


wilderness track

wilderness track

For those of us who like to play with art materials and explore new avenues without boundaries, mixed media is wonderful. Above, “Wilderness Track” is a large work painted in acrylic which was applied from very dilute, like watercolour, to thick impasto painted on with a palette knife. Pencils, oil pastel, soft pastel sumi ink and white pigment ink were all applied at various stages. The ground was an Art Spectrum Colorfix paper in a rich terracotta colour, hence the warm overall glow. The inspiration was a coastal walking track on Tasmania.s Tarkine coast. Walking between the towering angular rocks is amazing.

Raw

Raw

On one of the days over Easter 2015 when I was, with about 70 other artists,on Tasmania’s Tarkine Coast, I was taken on a 4WD expedition down past the sealed tracks. To get to such remote and wild places was unforgettable. It is the geology of the area that continually attracts me…. and of course the ever changing ocean and sky.This work is also painted on Colorfix paper, this time in a warm grey. After working with very wet acrylic paints and a spray bottle of water, I used  the side of the wet solid Sumi ink stick  and  a little liquid ink applied with a rigger brush to keep the stokes fluid and loose. Finally linear marks with charcoal and a touch of pastel completed the textural effects for which I was aiming.IMG_8994This third painting was about the intensity of the colour of the red lichen so it was started with oil paint stick and oil pastel on a very rough Fabriano watercolour paper. Light watercolour washes were applied to the sky and sea as a foil for the heavy texture of the rocks. Watercolour was also applied as glazes over the rocks, with the previously applied oil based media acting as a resist, thus retaining the intense colour.  Finally Sumi ink was added in three ways….. dragging the broad end of the wet stick across the paper, drawing some crevice lines directly with the wet stick, applying the ink using 2 brushes to direct flow for tonal areas, and varied ways of applying with a rigger brush. Wonderful textures resulted.  
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This small,  quick work was completed primarily with acrylic applied with a palette knife and fingers. Final touches were added with Sumi ink and a little oil pastel. It captures the drama and inspiring natural forms of this threatened wilderness area.

Back down to the Tarkine Coast…. more photos of the Tasmania I love.


I can’t get too much of this place. The weather is so changeable, the play of light fantastic. And the colours!!!! Lichen in reds, yellows, oranges, green and white.  Twisted tree trunks and mounds of green vegetation crouching in the wind. Energetic deep blue seas decorated with brilliant white foam.  And skies full of light then hidden by threatening clouds. A photographer’s delight.IMG_8858

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Geological influence in painting


Acrylic on Canvas, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast, Tasmania

Acrylic on Canvas, Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast, Tasmania

Geo-artscape, Tarkine of the amazing geology of Sarah Anne Rocks of the Tarkine area, Tasmania’s west coast, is the latest painting from my Easter participation in Tarkine in Motion. The event currently has an incredible selection  of photos on display at the Salerno Gallery in Sydney.
This painting is an acrylic on gallery stretched canvas, using texture media to add to the indication of the sharp edged layers of contorted strata. The lichen crust on these rocks ranges from vivid orange to ochres and greenish white.
This region is exposed to the roaring 40s weather system…. it is wild and raw and a visit is truly invigorating. For artists, scientists and conservationists alike this region is very special.
This artwork captures what I feel from the area.
It is for sale and will be on display at Devonport Regional Art Gallery from Friday 15th May for 3 weeks. Price on request. (size 91cm x 61cm)

Tasmania’s Wild West Coast… Tarkine wilderness video


Over Easter I was part of a group of 70 artists who visited Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness to draw attention to the need to ensure this area is preserved for it’s exceptional beauty, to share with the world and future generations. I was a tiny part of this group which included many photographers, film makers (hence this clip), painters, a jewellery maker, printmaker, musicians, writers, actor….. Do watch this film, it is so inspiring and you will understand why we are passionate about making sure the area is used respectfully.

Tarkine in motion https://youtu.be/7mGvFg-g0Qw via @YouTube

Tarkine Coast, Tasmanian Wilderness, photos


Over Easter I will be joining a group of artists on a special visit to the Tarkine Wilderness of the West Coast of Tasmania. The aim of the expedition is to promote the importance of keeping this unique area as it is for future generations. There is so much natural history here and evidence of the original inhabitants…. the Tasmanian aboriginal people. Such an inspiring place…. wild and rugged, lashed by the roaring forties…. waves that have not touched land since South America. Truly invigorating.
We visited today as a precursor to the Easter trip. here is a little taster…. though today I did not paint as it started to rain, but the photography was fun. DSCF6997

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Acrylic on canvas…. all that sand!


This is a scene I have painted before because I just love going back, mentally/emotionally, to the day we walked down from the lighthouse along this track carved through the dunes on Tasmania’s West Coast. The weather had been very changeable but now the sun was out, intensifying the colour contrasts with the white sand. I so wanted to reach the water but we ran out of time. I never will walk the stretch to the water’s edge but as I paint I feel myself being immersed again in the wonder of our wilderness in Tasmania. I have entered this work in TasArt, one of Tasmania’s premiere art exhibitions. It is a selected exhibition so this painting may not be hung but that is OK…. it does for me what I want…. takes me back to a lovely day at a wonderful location. I have titled it Light After the Storm, not only because of the weather change, but also as a reminder that even through stormy passages in our lives things can turn out wonderfully. If it sells, that is great…. someone else feels the emotion with which this was painted. If not that is fine too…. the other 3 of this scene (a miniature, a watercolour and an acrylic) have sold and I do want one for myself eventually.
E Antonysen Light after the storm copy

Did sell on opening night… guess I have to do another for me. Won’t be straight away but I will tackle it again.

Mill Providore Miniatures Exhibition


I was proud to be presented with a gold medal for the President’s choice at this exhibition. If in Launceston you must have a look at the Australian Society for Miniature Art 2012 Annual Exhibition. Such variety this year and our artists are very skilled. Little treasures to hold in the hand, or display individually or as a group on a wall without needing a big space.