Tasmanian Waterfall… mixed media watercolour


I have a lovely friend (Laurie Davison) who takes the most magnificent photos of Tasmanian waterfalls and gets to ones no-one else does. No way could I walk where he does, so he has kindly allowed me to do my loose painterly interpretations of his photo.

This is a waterfall near Deloraine in the Meander Valley, Tasmania, at the base of the Western Tiers. I loved the greens in his photo, indicating the excellent environmental health of the area. So good to see.

A little more work to do on this. Mixed media painting, but it captures the freshness of our Tasmanian Wilderness

good health

I started with oil pastel as a resist to make sureI got some fresh greens and texture. The support is 300gsm Saunders Rough paper. After the oil pastel came the watercolour, wet in wet, but reserving some whites by not painting the area. A bit of dry brush for sparkle. Sumi ink for some calligraphic strokes. Scraping with a blade to bring back a few more sparkles and a few strokes of Chinese white. Inktense pencils were used to re-enforce some areas.

Gotta love playing with mixed media. I am fortunate to have a huge amount of art materials (the clock is ticking and I feel the urge to make sure I use them all!!!!!!)

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SonyA7ii camera shots… Murwillumbah.


Still learning how to get the most out of this little beast, but here are some pics of our holiday over the past few weeks. ……. Murwillumbah area (includes Natural Bridge Falls) .

 

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I only have the 24 to 70 mm lens at present (and a macro) so could not zoom in to Mt warning. This is about 5% 0f the image at 70mm but because the camera is full frame it is not too bad for a postcard type shot..

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Slow shutter speed without a tripod is helped by the in camera stabilisation.

 

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No my usual subject, but the strong light and contrastsappealed.

 

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Morning light

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“How green is my valley”

Winter garden, Victoria


I have enjoyed using the Sony A7ii around my sister’s garden today, at Yarra Junction, Victoria, Australia.

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I have yet to get the macro lens out but the high megapixel, full frame images allow for cropping anyway.Very pleased with this camera so far.

Tarkine in Motion …Hobart, Long Gallery, Exhibition


I wish I could get to Hobart for the opening of the Tarkine in Motion exhibition tomorrow evening. Artworks evolving out of 70 artists responding to Tasmania’s Tarkine Wilderness will be on display at Hobart’;s Long Gallery until 4th February 2016. (50 of the 70 artists exhibiting in the is huge display).

Tasmania is fairly small yes, but it is about a 4 hour drive each way from our home to Hobart, so it is not as easy as non Tasmanian’s might think to “pop down” to our capital city.

I have already delivered some works to be hung but I have seen mine…. I really want to see those of everyone else. We will get down for bump out…. hopefully before others start collecting their treasures.

As you will see from these images of 4 of the 5 works I sent to be considered for inclusion, I was drawn, as usual, to the coast, the raw energy, the water movement and especially the rocks.

Geoartscape, Sarah Anne Rocks

Geo-artscape, Sarah Anne Rocks. Acrylic on stretched canvas.

Struggle for Survival

“”Struggle for Survival” watercolour, 300gsm SW rough paper. Sarah Anne Rocks, Tarkine Coast. 2015

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Red Lichen, Acrylic on Colourfix

The Calm Belies the Turmoil acrylic on gallery stretched canvas

The Calm Belies the Turmoil. Acrylic on stretched canvas

 

 

The preliminary photo from  Dan Broun of setting up looks good. A treasure trove of photography, painting, printmaking and jewellery…. and there will be floor talks. There have already been a number of musical and film performances which have been presented to enthusiastic audiences in Hobart. We want to save this last bit of Gondwanaland with its rich indigenous heritage rather than have it destroyed by logging and mining. Ironically, at present, much is under bushfires started by dry lightening strikes. Lets hope, at least, the old rainforest is not damaged too much. We so desperately need rain

 

A walk in the rainforest…. Trowutta Arch, Tasmania’s Tarkine


It was a lovely spring day here in Tasmania today and we took our camper out for a run. Tarkine wilderness again, but this time not the coast. Still wonderful geology in the limestone karst formations and the most magnificent reflections in the water at Trowutta Arch. Along the way fungi, ferns, mosses, lichen and liverworts below a canopy which let streams of light through.

Along the temperate rainforest track. So many man ferns (Dicksonia Antartica)IMG_9079

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And “fairyland” magic in the micro world

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Then at the end of the walk we were rewarded with amazing reflections and limestone formations.

 


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Mixed media paintings… the playful artist


wilderness track

wilderness track

For those of us who like to play with art materials and explore new avenues without boundaries, mixed media is wonderful. Above, “Wilderness Track” is a large work painted in acrylic which was applied from very dilute, like watercolour, to thick impasto painted on with a palette knife. Pencils, oil pastel, soft pastel sumi ink and white pigment ink were all applied at various stages. The ground was an Art Spectrum Colorfix paper in a rich terracotta colour, hence the warm overall glow. The inspiration was a coastal walking track on Tasmania.s Tarkine coast. Walking between the towering angular rocks is amazing.

Raw

Raw

On one of the days over Easter 2015 when I was, with about 70 other artists,on Tasmania’s Tarkine Coast, I was taken on a 4WD expedition down past the sealed tracks. To get to such remote and wild places was unforgettable. It is the geology of the area that continually attracts me…. and of course the ever changing ocean and sky.This work is also painted on Colorfix paper, this time in a warm grey. After working with very wet acrylic paints and a spray bottle of water, I used  the side of the wet solid Sumi ink stick  and  a little liquid ink applied with a rigger brush to keep the stokes fluid and loose. Finally linear marks with charcoal and a touch of pastel completed the textural effects for which I was aiming.IMG_8994This third painting was about the intensity of the colour of the red lichen so it was started with oil paint stick and oil pastel on a very rough Fabriano watercolour paper. Light watercolour washes were applied to the sky and sea as a foil for the heavy texture of the rocks. Watercolour was also applied as glazes over the rocks, with the previously applied oil based media acting as a resist, thus retaining the intense colour.  Finally Sumi ink was added in three ways….. dragging the broad end of the wet stick across the paper, drawing some crevice lines directly with the wet stick, applying the ink using 2 brushes to direct flow for tonal areas, and varied ways of applying with a rigger brush. Wonderful textures resulted.  
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This small,  quick work was completed primarily with acrylic applied with a palette knife and fingers. Final touches were added with Sumi ink and a little oil pastel. It captures the drama and inspiring natural forms of this threatened wilderness area.

Goblins and fairies…. mischief in the garden


Mischief in the garden

Mischief in the garden

Where are the fairies?

Hiding…. but there is a little goblin hand coming around the stem from the left.

So there is!

I can see one of his hands.

He is hiding, must be scared.

The more I look at this the more I see my little fellow crouching a bit and clinging for dear life onto the fungi stem. I see an elongated rectangular shape, greenish head with a tuft of orange hair and his right leg bent at the knee as befits his overall clinging or climbing up position. Then on the other side a little fellow has his short right arm stretched up as he curves his body a little to his left. It is like looking at cloud patterns. Imagination running wild, all because of Anne’s comment re fairies.

That’s just brilliant!

Thanks for reading my weird ramblings re the “goblins”.

Love em!

He is totally there, the naughty critter has ripped the hem of the fairy’s lavender dress. She is sitting under the toadstool.

Clever you noticing that….. yes very naughty. And such a pretty dress it was.

ah but the little hedgepig on the right is even naughtier cos he was looking up her dress….

What a place of mischief is our garden.

………… the above is a discussion that evolved from my simple photo of a garden fungi I posted on Facebook. What a delight that social media can cause such enjoyment and evolution of an imaginative story