Landscape painting from the imagination…. winter


Winter (imagined)

Winter (imagined)

On Friday I took a small workshop on introduction to abstract art in acrylics. We discussed abstract art and googled images to see the diversity and degrees of abstraction. This is a painting I did on canvas board. “Winter”… the mountains just appeared… abstracted? This is not based on any real place or even an intention to paint mountains and snow. it just evolved ….. whenever I play with paint I am likely to end up with something suggesting a landscape. It is hardly realism but does it meet “abstraction”. I prefer the term” landscapes from the imagination” and as this started to emerge from the canvas I was reminded of a painting done about this time last year of Everest Base Camp. What I most wanted participants to do was to explore a multitude of ways to apply paint to a surface. This was primarily done with the palette knife. It is such FUN and even as adults we should give ourselves permission to “play” and “waste” materials as it is through doing this that we learn.

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Mt Everest Basecamp…. acrylic on canvas


This is what I have been working on most recently… a commission piece. I have not been to the Himalayas… this is worked from a friend’s photo. I do know mountains and snow and hope this gives the feeling of the location.Everest base camp acrylic 2013

Water Ways Exhibition Tasmania 2013


contrasting texturesDuring the My State Australian Wooden Boat Festival in Southern Tasmania in February the Art Society of Tasmania holds an exhibition of artworks on the theme of water. I am pleased that my entry Contrasting Textures has been selected to be hung in this exhibition at the Long Gallery in Salamanca Place. This rather large painting is an acrylic on canvas incorporating texture paste to accentuate the solidity and rough texture of the forground rocks which echo roughly the shapes of the dolerite slopes of iconic Cradle Mt. The relective waters of Dove Lake glisten where the light strikes and look mirror like in the foreground pool. Water is also evident in the sky in the delicate thin mist… another contrasting texture suggested through the method of paint application. Drybrush scumbling was used here while for the rocks palette knife work added boldness and substance. In the water’s reflective area smoothly brushed glazes achieved the desired effect.

Oil Pastel Painting


Wow these colours are bright…..maybe over the top…. but being someone who often uses a touch of a complimentary colour in a mix  to slightly neutralize the colours in my traditional landscape works, I find this contrasting style rather stunning. A different support this time tends to give stronger colour. Get the old oil pastels out and try it! I will have to do a workshop on this technique I reckon. If you are a community or art group who want to host one, please talk to me. All those in my classes so far have enjoyed this process and been impressed with their results …. and the materials are not expensive.  Best suited to flower field type works but I have ideas for other subjects (along with thousands of other art ideas which may or may not be born). This one was inspired by sunset in our Tassie mountain areas and the plains that are covered with our whites native iris ( I was thinking of visits to Lake Lea up Cradle Mt way but it is not topographically acurate at all)

Scumbling technique for mist


This 40×50 cm acrylic on canvas is the demo painting I worked on at last weekend’s Adult Education workshop. It was painted using the primary colours and white (no black) using brushes and palette knife. The main technique for creating the transparency of the thin veil of mist and the soft but volumous clouds was dry brush scumbling. No wonder I wear my brushes out!

The finished work, titled “Ephemeral Veil”, features Mt Roland and is on display at the Tasmanian Regional Arts Kentish,Acrylic on canvas Working Art Space and Gallery at Albert St Sheffield for July, August.

SOLD. going to live in NSW.