October Workshops


BURNIE SHINES workshops. Drawing and Painting….. Beach Combers Collections. Including using Inktense Pencils. Draw and paint shells, rock, seaweed with tutor Evelyn Antonysen. Sunday October 7th. Book at the Makers Workshop. Also on Saturday September 13th Free flow wet-in-wet watercolour (beach) and Sunday 14th a little bit of Zen doing Sumi E (Chinese brush painting). Learn how to handle a brush with sensitivity to make a wide variety of marks. Grind your own Sumi Ink.

Tasmanian Art Exhibition entries (Eskleigh 2012)


This year I have entered three small works in the Eskleigh exhibition. There is no traditional landscape of a recognisable location, rather I have selected different media for their ability to communicate a particular mood or intent. Each painting is accompanied by a short (max25 words) statement which I have included here.

 

Meditation. (Watercolour). Light filled space, calligraphic foliage, balance. Simplicity. Zen influences create a meditation on paper.

Beach Abstraction. (Coloured Pencil: Inktense and watercolour pencils). Exaggerating the colours and tonal contrasts emphasises the abstract qualities of these natural forms (bull kelp).

Industrial (acrylic, encaustic and gold leaf on gallery stretched canvas) Representing the range of textures evident in industrial areas, usually adjacent to water. Polluted landscapes, but within, spots of beauty can be discovered.

Coloured Pencil works…Beach things


Some months ago I posted a half completed image of bull kelp worked in Derwent  Inktense and watercolour pencils. Today I have the finshed work (photographed after framing to go to the Eskleigh art exhibition. This means the photo is not as good as it coud be due to the glass). For the wide bit of kelp in the front I took advantage of the texture of the paper to suggest sand. I did not dissolve the pencil marks much in order to retain the sand look. This contrasted with the main tubular kelp to the left in which I completely dissolved the pigment. The use of Inktense exaggerates the colour and adds to the abstracted quality of this unusual subject.

The second work showcases some of my collection of shells and “invented” rounded beach stones. The colours here are more natural. I love giving the illusion of 3D on a flat 2D paper surface. I have even found myself at times, when packing up, glancing across and going to pick up a shell to find it is an illustration. You will notice that my collection includes many broken shells. I love their internal structure (especially spirals) and the holes. .Perceived imperfections offer the opportunity to find alternative positives (much like with people). I started this work in November 2011 and have just one shell to complete (a small abalone, mother-of-pearl side showing) The work has been sold which makes me a bit more anxious about not mucking up the final shell!

SEAWEED PAINTINGS


I have painted many beach scenes, often with  trails of washed up seaweed. Shells have also been a perennial favorite as have rounded beach stones. But recently I have been painting closes ups of the magnificent bull kelp which I enjoy photographing. I hope my students don’t mind as I enthusiastically encourage them to feel equally inspired by the wonderful textures and patterns (I am very pleased with their results so  far).

 Shiny wet tubes, grainy sand, tangles of softer brightly coloured weed and wonderful holes in the kelp like little windows to more patterns. These 2 watercolours are the first of what I expect to be a larger collection. One of them (completed last Saturday) is already framed to go in my Launceston Country Club exhibition which opens Saturday 27 August