Shells, White on Black


This handmade star book is a project undertaken at my Tuesday evening session. The white on black illustrations are  of broken shells and the internal structure of shells. Spiral patterns are common in nature and I find looking at unusual viewpoints intriuging. The appealing broken peices also address the notion that things (people) perceived as less than visually perfect can be fasinating and beautiful. For the white I started with various pencils… white coloured and pastel pencils in various brands giving varying opacity and Chinagraph giving a dense application. For most images however I used white inks….. Derivan was weak and good for the shadowed ares while the dense white of Magicolor was excellent for highlights. The type of black paper also made a difference as some cheap ones started to release dye into the ink. Overall an interesting exercise.

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Coloured Pencil works…Beach things


Some months ago I posted a half completed image of bull kelp worked in Derwent  Inktense and watercolour pencils. Today I have the finshed work (photographed after framing to go to the Eskleigh art exhibition. This means the photo is not as good as it coud be due to the glass). For the wide bit of kelp in the front I took advantage of the texture of the paper to suggest sand. I did not dissolve the pencil marks much in order to retain the sand look. This contrasted with the main tubular kelp to the left in which I completely dissolved the pigment. The use of Inktense exaggerates the colour and adds to the abstracted quality of this unusual subject.

The second work showcases some of my collection of shells and “invented” rounded beach stones. The colours here are more natural. I love giving the illusion of 3D on a flat 2D paper surface. I have even found myself at times, when packing up, glancing across and going to pick up a shell to find it is an illustration. You will notice that my collection includes many broken shells. I love their internal structure (especially spirals) and the holes. .Perceived imperfections offer the opportunity to find alternative positives (much like with people). I started this work in November 2011 and have just one shell to complete (a small abalone, mother-of-pearl side showing) The work has been sold which makes me a bit more anxious about not mucking up the final shell!

latest worlshops and classes


Yesterday I worked on a watercolour of one of my favourite subjects… the energy and movement of the sea as it impacts on rocks… a painting which always makes me feel alive as I do it as I “feel” the movement of the wave and the solidity and strength of the rock. The people present did  not see the finished work as we had several activities going. Theo and Arthur explored Inktense pencils…… both visiting Tassie in motorhomes, the medium is perfect for those on the move. Arthur also discovered the advantage of a solid sumi ink stick and stone…. no spills and it lasts “forever”.  Being a good at drawing, ink and inktense wash suits the style of these men.

Lynne did magnificantly vibrant bookmarks, full of colour. Not having done art before, she bravely explored wet in wwet watercolour with koh-i-noor intense colours.

Sue, an experienced artist, bravely painted the sea wave explosion on Fabriano torchon extra rough paper. She came to learn about the textural effects which can be obtained on the surface. So different to her usual Saunders Waterford paper.

The slide show is of some other students’ works in oil pastel, Inktense (including one on silk) and Watercolour (using the pouring technique for the background). Unfortunately I am usually to busy to remember to phtograph work. at classes and workshops.

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Workshops Jan, Feb 2012


I am back home, many hundreds of photos later. Loads of inspiration. Wonderful catching up with family and friends. Now busy with commissions (bad luck about Christmas). Spent last night organising New year art sessions. I spaced this lot more (hope it suits Natalia).

 Includes Inktense Pencil (Jan 21), Watercolour with a Zen influence (Jan 27), Silk Painting Feb 3, Finger Painting for Adults 6 Feb, Kiln formed Glass 17 Feb, 3D with Polymer Clay 23 Feb.  For more details see post Dec 24 or ph 03 64282675 or leave a message and I will email you.

INKTENSE PENCIL Demo


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This Sunday 23rd Oct at Penguin Market I will demonstrate working with Inktense and other watercolour (aquarelle) pencils. Inktense are very soft and make beautifully vibrant marks which can be dissolved and blended easily… looking like transparent layers of ink. I tend to use them in conjunction with various water soluble pencils. I will have a variety you can try to see how different brands vary and I will offer hints on how I find they are best used. The  slide show here shows the nasturtiums I painted on silk using gutta technique last Sunday and a couple of examples of working with Inktense and Aquarelle pencils. (note these are quick i-phione photos taken indoors so reproduction accuracy is limited. The wren is unfinished).

INKTENSE WORKSHOP


NEXT INKTENSE WORKSHOP; SATY JANUARY 21st 2012 ph03  64282675

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First we played a little to see what marks could be made, how variable applications of water made a difference, and to get an idea of colour intensity.  Then I set a task of drawing beach stones where each stone could be treated in a different way (some chose shells from my collection). I did a quick reminder sketch of using tone to suggest a 3D form then it was all systems go. No works absolutely completed but looking promising. Not as varied  results as from their palette knife flowers workshop (shown on an earlier post) but this was a more tightly structured session. Some participants were not happy with their fan shell works so I quickly demonstrated frottage (rubbings) which worked well (and even better if more time and care taken). Because the colours stay fixed after wetting this medium is great for patterning then laying another colour over (such as a shodow) . The patterns underneath will be retained.