Tasmanian treasures in Encaustic Wax


I have been enjoying doing little encaustic wax paintings, incorporating specimens of flora I collected and pressed when I was Artist in Residence at Cradle Mt Wilderness Gallery. The plant samples are collected from the world of mosses, ferns and fallen leaves on the forest floor… a niche I also love to photograph. These creative art paintings are presented in shadow box frames which I construct from Tas Oak timber.

Fern i

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They are now being offered for sale at Cradle Mt Wilderness Gallery for visitors to purchase a little of the local environment is an original. artwork

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Macro garden shots from Sony A7ii


Today, with a little welcome sunshine, I took my mirror-less, full frame camera into the garden to try out the macro lens (FE2.8/90). The poor flowers were a little worse for wear from the recent rain, icy weather and winds and some parts of our garden/jungle are so overgrown I did not venture to capture all my gorgeous camellias.

I did not use a tripod…. not really a good idea with macro shots, but being impatient, I wanted first to see what sort of photos lazy play would give. With the use of a tripod and more manual adjustments the results should only get better.

Even with this quick episode I am pretty happy….. those potato vine flowers are 3 cm across the widest part of the biggest one and the tiny forget me nots  are 9mm (less than 1 cm) or less across the widest part of the bigger one!!!! (in summer I find they grow larger)

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Winter garden, Victoria


I have enjoyed using the Sony A7ii around my sister’s garden today, at Yarra Junction, Victoria, Australia.

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I have yet to get the macro lens out but the high megapixel, full frame images allow for cropping anyway.Very pleased with this camera so far.

SPRING is here in Tasmania… Spring Collection, watercolour printed onto a fridge magnet


It is still a bit cool of an evening but the days have been sunny and clear as we enjoy spring. The camellias and daffodils look so fresh and colourfulmagnet Spring Collection and I am enjoying the garden delights both in the garden and indoors. This watercolour shows some of my garden blooms. I have reproduced this painting onto fridge magnets (available for $4 post free) (size 50 x 90 mm)

Material Girl entry …..2014 finalist


I am really pleased that for the third consecutive year my entry in Tasmania’s Material Girl Exhibition has made the finals. This year’s theme is Tall poppies…. late bloomers. I pondered a portrait of “tall poppies’, Mother Moses being a favourite “tall poppy, and very much a “late bloomer”. I love painting poppies, especially on silk, so did contemplate maybe a literal interpretation. Then I thought of doing a very minimalist contemporary style work…. a single (actual) poppy seed glued onto a large canvas (medium: “collage” I suppose). That would be titled simple “Potential”.
After listening to Jane Lamont talk at the launch, where the amazing woman described herself as rather a short, yellow,daisy I started thinking along another line. I love the variety of friends and family in my life, tall poppies or not. I love the variety of flowers in the garden and that they reveal their full glory at different times. So my entry is “Not all tall poppies” the acrylic painted with a palette knife, an image of which I posted about a month ago.

Acrylic on canvas painted with a palette knife.  "Not all Tall Poppies" Material Girl 2014 Finalist

Acrylic on canvas painted with a palette knife.
“Not all Tall Poppies”
Material Girl 2014 Finalist


Accompanying Artist’s Statement
Variety is the “spice of Life”. Genetics, environment, life’s circumstances…. all contribute to what something is and when potential will be maximised.
A world full of only tall poppies would not have the colour, interest and variety of “my” world with all it’s magnificent individuals.

small watercolours


I do paint miniatures but those works are generally very detailed in the manner preferred by the international societies. The miniatures I submit for competitions are most often in oils, painted meticulously on a smooth surface so lines are not accidentally broken. But the works below are not miniature in that sense (although the silk ones certainly fit within the 100 square cm maximum size permitted under WFM rules). These are small works painted loosely in card format…. 145 by 105mm . I just love doing these … so relaxing and meditative. No drawing up, just free watercolour using soft brushes on paper or silk. Some others I did a few weeks ago have already been purchased by buyers from France, mainland Australia, England and the USA. I wonder where these will end up.
Well I know where the one of Goat Island (second from top on left} will end up. In Germany. It was bought by one of the people from the cruise ship in Burnie on Tuesday, along with a frame, to be given to the ship’s captain. wc caeds 2

flowers wc cards

cards 2wc and 2silk