Bakers Beach painting finished and West Point, Burnie “whipped” sea


Following on from the previous post, the She Oak has been added to my Bakers Beach acrylic on stretched canvas. You can see what I mean about this twiggy windswept coastal vegetation contrasting with soft clouds and the sweep of the sand and water. The colour contrast with the sky is also appealed to me and was a reason for taking the reference photo at that spot.

She Oak, Bakers Beach, Tasmania Acrylic on canvas

She Oak, Bakers Beach, Tasmania
Acrylic on canvas


This second work is an acrylic on “canvas paper” which was a demonstration for last night’s art class. My ladies deviated from watercolour to try their hand at acrylics and did a great job. My reference for this was a photo of West Point in Burnie, just behind the Makers Workshop. Last time I was there the weather was rather stormy and incredibly windy with the sea surging energetically. The lure of the subtle colour of the late afternoon sky to the west drew me out with my camera. I may still touch this up a bit but am not quite sure as working quickly often captures the vitality of such moments better than a carefully rendered and laboured work.
"Whipped Sea" West Point, Burnie, Tasmania Acrylic on canvas paper

“Whipped Sea” West Point, Burnie, Tasmania
Acrylic on canvas paper

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2 comments on “Bakers Beach painting finished and West Point, Burnie “whipped” sea

  1. Both are so beautiful! You did a wonderful job blending the colors, which I sometimes find to be tricky with acrylics due to their fast drying time. Great work.

  2. Thanks for the positive feedback. Yes acrylics do dry (too?) fast…. makes you work fast with big brushes. In the big painting I am using Atelier Interactive and a light spray with their extra fine mist sprayer helps. But the other used Jo Sonja which are really a craft acrylic and they dry so fast. Could have used a retarder but I wanted too show students how to work with minimum extras (just water). One trick is to use your fingers (actually broad side of palm of hand) to quickly blend larger areas. The other work methods used were fast sweeps with big brushes (lively), and use of palette knife.

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